Towards an Expanded Disciplinary History

Jonathan Goodwin and I had the chance to team up again at the [Texas Digital Humanities Conference][txdhc]. While our work began with the chronological topic models built last year, Goodwin has recently been experimenting with [co-citational network graphs][jg] based on data drawn from the Web of Science. (We had to depend upon the Web of Science data because the citational data from JSTOR is currently unavailable.)

While we contemplate how to integrate the co-citational data with the topic models, I found myself recalling that the American Folklore Society also has a collection of abstracts submitted for the annual meetings for at least the last few years. I wondered if that material was available through [Open Folklore][]. It isn’t, but the [program brochures and books][bb] produced for AFS annual meetings from 1949 are.

[txdhc]: http://txdhc.org/
[jg]: http://www.jgoodwin.net/folklore-network/slider/highlight.html
[Open Folklore]: http://openfolklore.org/
[bb]: https://scholarworks.iu.edu/dspace/handle/2022/13071

TEI for Folklore

As Elisa walked me through her TEI-encoded documents, and showed me the XSLT she uses to transform the TEI encoding into network files, I realized that I needed to start working on my own use of TEI. A quick search *ye olde web* for “TEI folklore” turned up … not much.

Two things occur to me: First, this represents an opportunity to be involved in getting TEI up and running in folklore studies, and, second, I need to start collecting useful links:

* So far, it looks like [oral history][] is leading the way.
* The [MLA][] recently received a grant from the NEH to “to begin development of Humanities Commons Open Repository Exchange, or Humanities CORE. Humanities CORE will connect a library-quality repository for sharing, discovering, retrieving, and archiving digital work with Humanities Commons, a developing platform for collaboration among scholarly societies and other humanities organizations.”
* There are [seminars][] on TEI encoding.

**Please note**: if you know of already extant implementations of TEI in folklore studies, please let me know! I don’t want to re-invent the wheel. Drop me a note, if you can, and I’ll add links here, with credits for contributors. (Or we can do this somewhere else, if you like. G+?)

[oral history]: http://www.cdlib.org/groups/stwg/OH_BPG.html
[MLA]: http://news.commons.mla.org/2014/03/27/grant-awarded-for-the-development-of-humanities-core/
[seminars]: http://www.wwp.brown.edu/outreach/seminars/