Math for Humanists

Patrick Juola and Stephen Ramsay announceed the publication of their new book, Six Septembers, though Zea Books, The University of Nebraska-Lincoln’s digital imprint. More than ten years in development, this book provides a broad conceptual introduction to the fundamentals of the mathematics that digital humanists are likely to encounter and to support high-level understanding of a variety of key mathematical ideas. The book is freely available under a Creative Commons CC-BY license, and can be downloaded from here.

File under: #iwasthinkingaboutwritingthisbook.

One Meaning of “Statistical Analysis”

One of the things that interests me is all the ways that “statistical analysis” can be defined, even within the confines of a relatively nascent domain like text analytics. Of course, being nascent also means that things are not yet defined. Moreover, as a domain, text analytics is emerging at the intersection of a number of fields. Some of the differences about assumptions of what were the applicable dimensions of statistics, let alone mathematics, were quite striking at this year’s Culture Analytics program at UCLA’s Institute for Pure and Applied Mathematics.

Below is a recent request posted on The Humanist that I am capturing here as another entry in this area:

The work will involve investigating the temporal relationships between
spoken and gesture events, so experience with methods for conducting
statistical analysis (correlation, t-test, anova, hypothesis testing) are expected.

In addition, the preferred workflow is as follows:

Ideally, the work will be done in Python (ideally using pandas), but if people prefer using R, I’d be happy to hear from them.

DH@Guelph Summer Workshops

The University of Guelph, in Ontario, Canada, is hosting a collection of workshops May 9-12. A lot happens in those 3 to 4 days:

  1. Getting Going with Omeka with
    Lisa Cox, Adam Doan, Melissa McAfee, Catharine Wilson.
  2. You’ve Got Data!: Introduction to Data Wrangling for Digital Humanities Projects with Paige Morgan.
  3. Text Encoding Fundamentals and Their Application with Jason Boyd.
  4. Minimal Computing for Digital Humanists with Kim Martin and John Fink.
  5. 3D Modelling for the Digital Humanities and Social Sciences_ with
    John Bonnett.
  6. Spatial Humanities: Exploring Opportunities in the Humanities Jennifer Marvin and Quin Shirk-Luckett.
  7. Online Collaborative Scholarship: Principles and Practicies (A CWRCshop) with Susan Brown, Mihaela Ilovan, and Leslie Allin.

Full details are here.

Linguistic Engineering

A recent posting from _The Humanist_ noted the following:

> The MPhil Linguistics at the VU University Amsterdam now offers a two-years specialization in Linguistic Engineering. Linguistic Engineering is a young research field that holds a unique position between linguistics and computer science. The program is offered by the Computational Lexicology and Terminology Lab (CLTL), a leading research group in computational linguistics.
>
> Bachelors in linguistics, computer science, artificial intelligence or a comparable bachelor’s programme are encouraged to apply. Programming skills are not required, but candidates do need a clear motivation and a firm linguistic background.
>
> Take a look at the website of the CLTL for information about the program and the CLTL research group: http://www.cltl.nl/le for details.
>
> For more information on the MPhil Linguistics, admission and application, visit the VU University at: http://www.vu.nl/en/programmes/international-masters/programmes/l-m/linguistics-research/index.asp

Somewhere some part of me wants to respond “I do not think that means what you think it means” but another part of me recognizes that I am just fascinated by how these things are playing out.