Strengths in the Humanities

Jason Jackson is one of those people I wish I could be around more: he is principled, thoughtful, and acts for the long-term. So when he casually tags something on social media, I’ll almost always have a look. Most recently, he linked to an article by Helene Meyers in Inside Higher Education on How small liberal arts colleges can best weather the pandemic, noting that humanities scholars might take a few tips from Meyers.

The entire article is worth a read, but for the purposes of re-thinking my own courses for the fall, and just generally re-thinking how I teach, I want to focus on the following things that Meyer highlights as strengths of liberal arts colleges:

  • low faculty/student ratios and small classes “allow meaningful mentoring relationships with faculty members as well as peer education. What if a British-style tutorial were part of every first-year student’s experience? Among smaller groups, meetings powered by Zoom can foster intellectual community, while online discussion forums can require students to respond to one another’s writing.”
  • intensive research seminars “where faculty-guided independent work is supplemented with a cohort of peers who can help vet one another’s projects and learn to ask (and answer) critical questions about both the research process and its products should be provided for upper-class students.”
  • study pandemic-related topics “to [help students] process the experiences of this moment” keeping mind that some students “might need to lose themselves in a passion that seems distant from the horrors of the present.”
  • integrate career coaching throughout the curriculum because “the next few graduating classes will be entering a brutal job market, and we owe our students careful instruction in the development and transferability of marketable skills.”

I see all these things as possible and even within my reach — so long as I am willing to stretch — with career coaching being the weakest point for me. Here, I will have to do more research and, I think, I will also have to consider ways to highlight portable skills/methods/ideas. (I know, I know: it’s the commodification of knowledge and education, but nothing says that making things complex or emphasizing, and perhaps teaching, that all syntheses are dynamic and ever-changing can’t be built into any particular course program or disciplinary curriculum.)

*This post is part of a series in which I design a new course, ENGL 334: Digital Folklore and Culture, in the open. I do so for myself, for my colleagues, and for my students. They are all collected under the tag open course design.