Who is this course for?

This post is one of several in which I am designing a new course, ENGL 334: Digital Folklore and Culture, that I will also be teaching in a new context, remotely, and doing so completely in the open. Other posts are tagged open course design.

The Udemy How to Set Your Course Goals course begins with a consideration of who is the target student, with the understanding that courses that attempt to reach too broad of an audience end up reaching no one. Beginners feel overwhelmed and experienced individuals feel under-served. Target an audience.

After brainstorming on paper for a bit, I came up with, I think a basic list:

This course assumes that participants:

  • while fully enrobed in cultural, and folkloric, dynamics do not necessarily understand those dynamics,
  • but are interested in, and committed to, that understanding;
  • have a working familiarity with the research process — the development of an hypothesis, the collection of data, the testing of ideas against the hypothesis, and the eventual development of a syn/thesis — and need for clear communication of results;
  • willing to apply ideas and methods learned in this course (and elsewhere in the university) to materials that seem ephemeral, trivial, trolling, ass-holish (racist, sexist, classist, etc.).§

§ This course also assumes participants can handle language and/or cultural artifacts that are of intentionally or intentionally provocative/offensive in nature. Indeed, this course assumes participants want to understand why people say/do such things.

Why did I switch to Udemy? May was both busy and not, but the month slipped by and I lost access to the edX 101 course on designing courses for edX. (The edX model is that you can audit, take for free, a course for a limited time, but if you want access to it for more than a month or if you want it to count towards a curriculum, then you have to pay for it. The “if you want credit” model worked for me, but “if you want access for more than a month” appears not work for me.) The upshot is that I have switched to the Udemy course, which also means I have switched to a platform that is open to hosting courses by individuals: both edX and Coursera offer courses through affiliated institutions and organizations. I don’t know that what I do will end up on Udemy, but I can certainly take advantage of their “market aware” approach to sharpen my thinking about the course.