The Reliability of Blogging Platforms

[Royal Pingdom has the results](http://royal.pingdom.com/2010/12/17/the-most-reliable-and-unreliable-blogging-services-2/) of their monitoring of five popular blogging platforms: Blogger, WordPress.com, TypePad, Posterous, Tumblr (spoler alert: listed in order of reliability). Ordinarily I would let this pass, but I am considering using a publicly available blogging platform for my digital humanities seminar. Why a public service? I want students to have something that can continue beyond their years at university: using our Moodle installation can’t do this. I am currently leaning towards [Wordpress.com](http://wordpress.com) because

1. I use it and am familiar with it
2. It’s open source
3. A number of digital humanities projects, e.g. CUNY’s [Academic Commons]( http://commons.gc.cuny.edu/), are built on it — or the other open source CMS, [Drupal](http://drupal.org/). (CUNY’s effort should not be confused with the other [Academic Commons](http://www.academiccommons.org/), which is equally interesting, but I don’t know if it’s built on WordPress CMS.)